39 Books: Daniel – Son of Man

39 Bks Torah Scroll WhiteDaniel – Son of Man

In Chapter 7, Daniel’s visions bring insight regarding the future – from a series of powerful empires to a kingdom that shall have no end – ruled by the Son of Man.

27 Daniel.pdf                  27 Daniel.mp3

Central Streaming: The Purest Gospel

Paul’s Letter to the Romansapostle-paul

Martin Luther call this letter “the purest gospel.”  Romans begins with grace and takes us into “the obedience of faith.”

Romans 01.01-17.pdf

Romans 01.01-17.mp3

Remember that one time we almost didn’t see the Sistine Chapel?

This is from my daughter, who was just in Rome and by this time just left for Ethiopia. Thanks Krystiana, for writing a little about your experiences.

Brim-Full with Immensity of Life

That’s what we’ll say to each other ten years from now. And we’ll nod and laugh and then we’ll tell the story to whoever will listen, and maybe we’ll embellish a little more each year, but maybe not, because it’s a pretty good story as it is.

Saturday, July 19 2014, 2:30pm.
We’ve just checked in to our unexpectedly lovely bed & breakfast in Rome, and set down with maps and lists and the internet to decide what to do with the wealth of a whole afternoon. We find out the Vatican museum is closed on Sundays, and we’ve waited twenty years and 4000 miles to see the Sistine Chapel, which makes the decision pretty easy. We look up bus routes.

2:50pm
We learn that, although the museum is open till 6, the ticket office closes at 4pm. We gather our things, exit the hotel, and run to what we…

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Palmer St. Podcast: Mystery Babylon

The Bible makes a clear distinction between true and false religion.  Jesus calls Himself “the truth” and calls the devil “the father of lies.”  This chapter looks forward to the climax of all false beliefs in the form of “Mystery Babylon.”

Rev 17.mp3

Rev 17.pdf

Rev 17.pptx

Religion in Rome – nothing to do with the Pope

First put this put this up about 4 years ago, and got to thinking about it again.  The key point is the title has to do with “decline and fall.  Not hoping for that by any means, just noticing a similarity.”

I recently stumbled upon this and thought it sounded a lot like the USA.  It’s from Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vol. I, ch. II:

“The policy of the emperors and the senate, as far as it concerned religion, was happily seconded by the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.”  (Emphasis added.)

In the yet-to-be-written The History of the Decline and Fall of the American Empire, vol. I, ch. II, it will state:  

“The average American was vaguely religious believing that it didn’t matter what one believed as long as one was sincere.  The devotee of science was convinced that all religion would become unnecessary if only people knew better.  Most politicians identified themselves as, ‘Christians who support Israel’ (but didn’t always give convincing evidence of either), and knew that Islam was undeniably a ‘religion of peace’ (while uncertain that religious knowledge even existed).  These points of view (though on the face of it contradictory) actually harmonized well enough in the public mind that the most of the diverse population managed to somehow get along with itself.”

Palmer St. Podcast: Acts 25-26

Any time that any person is confronted with the truth about Jesus, it demands a personal response. Two of the most common are to respond very negatively or try to avoid a response altogether. This section of the book of Acts allows us to closely examine these common responses to the gospel.

Acts25-26.mp3

Acts25-26.pdf

Religion in Rome

I recently stumbled upon this and thought it sounded a lot like the USA.  It’s from Edward Gibbon, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, vol. I, ch. II:

“The policy of the emperors and the senate, as far as it concerned religion, was happily seconded by the reflections of the enlightened, and by the habits of the superstitious, part of their subjects. The various modes of worship which prevailed in the Roman world were all considered by the people as equally true; by the philosopher as equally false; and by the magistrate as equally useful. And thus toleration produced not only mutual indulgence, but even religious concord.”  (Emphasis added.)

In the yet-to-be-written The History of the Decline and Fall of the American Empire, vol. I, ch. II, it will state:  

“The average American was vaguely religious believing that it didn’t matter what one believed as long as one was sincere.  The devotee of science was convinced that all religion would become unnecessary if only people knew better.  Most politicians identified themselves as, ‘Christians who support Israel’ (but didn’t always give convincing evidence of either), and knew that Islam was undeniably a ‘religion of peace’ (while uncertain that religious knowledge even existed).  These points of view (though on the face of it contradictory) actually harmonized well enough in the public mind that the diverse population managed to somehow get along with itself.”