Vicarious faith – Matthew 9:18-19, 23-26

Christ’s death for our sins is sometimes referred to as vicarious atonement.  He took responsibility for us when we were incapable of atoning for ourselves.  That is a wonderful fact and an essential concept that is basic to the Christian faith.  If you want, you can read more about it here.

Now we are going to talk about something else — vicarious faith — an idea central to the Christian life.  Needy people are not always in a position to believe.  They may need us to step in for them and take the responsibility upon ourselves to believe.  Our faith can stand in for their faith, our prayers for their prayers.  Matthew 9 shows us an extreme case.

18 While he was saying these things to them, behold, a ruler came in and knelt before him, saying, “My daughter has just died, but come and lay your hand on her, and she will live.” 19 And Jesus rose and followed him, with his disciples. … 23 And when Jesus came to the ruler’s house and saw the flute players and the crowd making a commotion, 24 he said, “Go away, for the girl is not dead but sleeping.”And they laughed at him. 25 But when the crowd had been put outside, he went in and took her by the hand, and the girl arose. 26 And the report of this went through all that district.

The ruler came to Jesus on behalf of his daughter.  She was dead.  In the house was a lifeless, breathless and certainly faithless corpse.  Her father reached out in faith when she was unable to believe for herself.  The mourners were no help.  Their expressions of grief were interrupted by their laughing at Jesus.  But Jesus did what Jesus does and the girl arose.  I want to exercise that kind of faith on behalf of others.

The easy way out? – Matthew 7:13-14

Toward the end of his Sermon on the Mount Jesus said,

13 “Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. 14 For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few.

Wouldn’t it be great if following Jesus was the easiest thing we could do?  Popularity, public approval, material well-being, and an absence of trials and temptations.  Isn’t that the life most of us would like to have?  It turns out a life like that is more likely to lead to destruction.

We can learn a few things from Christ’s first followers.  Neither the Gospels nor the book of Acts, nor the rest of the New Testament gives any evidence that those early believers were getting voted “Most Likely to Succeed” or winning popularity contests of any sort.  They didn’t take the easy way out.  Why should we expect anything different?  

We need to be careful here.  Lack of popularity is no guarantee we are faithfully following Jesus either.  It might just mean we are doing a lot wrong.  

Still, when we try our best to serve God in accordance with his revealed will, we can expect it to bring some difficulty.  We can also expect that quite a few others will decide to go another way — through a wide gate and down an easy path.  Many will take the easy way out.  Look around.  Which gate are you heading going through and which path are you following?  How does it compare with the way of the cross?

Complete Joy – 1 John 1:1-4

Apostle JohnComplete Joy     1 John 1:1-4

The fellowship Christ shares with his Father is now ours to delight in. The result is a fulfilled or completed joy.

1 John 1.1-4.pdf

1 John 1.1-4.mp3

 

Saved by Grace – Ephesians 2:1-10

ephesus-grand-theatre - from Ephesus Breeze
Saved by Grace – Ephesians 2:1-10

After praying that our hearts would be opened, Paul now describes in greater detail what it means to be saved.

 

Ephesians 2.01-10.pdf        Ephesians 2.01-10.mp3

Horizon University: Life and Works of C. S. Lewis


HU logo

We are excited toC-S-LEWIS announce that this summer Horizon University will be offering a 6-week course on The Life and Works of C. S.Lewis If you are in need of an elective for your degree or are simply interested in the writings of C.S. Lewis, please consider enrolling in this course. The course may be taken for credit toward a degree or as audit (no credit).
Please contact Registrar@horizonuniversity.edu with any questions you may have.
Summer 2017
Course:  GE301 Life and Works of C.S. Lewis
    Start:  May 29, 2017
    End:   July 9, 2017
Cost (for credit):  $850*
Cost (audit – not for credit): $120
*Note that financial aid is not available for courses taken during the summer term.
Description:
This course is a literary introduction to the life and works of C. S. Lewis. We will be examining both fiction and nonfiction, with an eye both for the spiritual (instructive, apologetic, etc.) value of Lewis’s work and his work as a scholar and creative mind. For this course you will have the opportunity to choose between two reading tracks. Track 1 provides an introduction to three of Lewis’s most iconic works, focusing on Christian apologetics, salvation and spiritual warfare, and the gospel communicated through fairy tale. Track 2 takes a more intimate approach to Lewis’s beliefs, focusing on his conversion, experience of suffering, and the writing he considered his best.

Central Streaming: Resurrection

The_Vision_of_The_Valley_of_The_Dry_Bones-810x557We serve a God who does not assure us that things will keep moving along nicely.  But he does give us hope that thing, ideas, dreams and people that die will rise again.

Ezekiel 36-37.pdf         Ezekiel 36-37.mp3

Honest Q & A: The Existence of God (3a) – Morals Exist (continued)

justiceIn a previous post I made the point that the idea that we are made in God’s image does a lot to explain our intuitive moral sense. If he is, and is good and we are wired to reflect his character, then human guilt (or the lack of it) is not merely a feeling, but the result of actual moral knowledge. Such knowledge may need refining, but it is not our invention.

One comment I received in said, “If knowledge of morality is granted by a morally perfect god, the feeling of moral disgust at his actions should not be possible. This necessitates an alternate method of attaining these feelings …”

We might reword this into a collection of questions something like these:

“If our understanding of morality is based on our being made in God’s image, then why don’t we always agree with him? How is it even possible for me to disagree? Why do I even have moral questions? Further, why do people ever disagree with one another in areas of right and wrong?”

These are great questions, but not particularly vexing, at least not from the biblical position. Speaking as a Christian, these tensions are not only explainable, they are exactly what we should expect. This is what I see in myself and what I see in others – and it is true for at least two reasons: 1) Our inborn need to grow in understanding, and 2) Our regrettably clouded vision.

  1. Our need to grow in understanding: The Bible agrees with our observable reality, revealing that no one is born with perfect wisdom or perfect moral sense. Even Jesus, like all people, grew in wisdom (Luke 2:52). Peter encourages us to “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ” (2 Peter 3:18). The book of Hebrews speaks of “the mature … those who have their powers of discernment trained by constant practice to distinguish good from evil” (Hebrews 5:14). In other words, our moral sense will not naturally agree with God’s any more than a student will always agree with her professor before doing the proper assignments, or a child will naturally agree with his parents while growing up. Time and normal effort can do their part to bring their views closer together. Much more is this true with us and God.
  2. Our regrettably clouded vision: Under the best of conditions we would still need to grow, but the conditions, alas, are not the best – far from it, in fact. The problem is our present state of rebellion. We don’t naturally see things from God’s perspective, nor even from some impartial neutral ground. Our nature has become corrupt, making us biased against him. We too often agree with God only if doing so gives us an advantage.

There is ample opportunity to change this state of affairs. We need to be taught and our fairly steep learning curve begins by getting into a right standing with him. Again, that implies growth and a change of heart. Karen Swallow Prior sees the right place as one of wonder, “Even the ability to doubt him, to struggle against him, to wonder at his ways is rooted in him. Certainty seems bigger than me, skepticism smaller. Wonder is just right.” (Booked, p. 191)