Many other things – John 21:25

The Gospel of John ends with these words,

And there are also many other things that Jesus did, which if they were written one by one, I suppose that even the world itself could not contain the books that would be written. Amen.

John records several miracles or “signs” as he likes to call them in order to draw attention to the Messiahship of Jesus. There is much teaching, much discussion, and many activities that John wants us to know about. Now, however, this Gospel comes to and end.

Not only does the Gospel of John end here, but John, being the last of four Gospels, completes the inspired record of Christ’s life. Jesus did much more than all this. The world itself could not contain the books, let alone this limited collection that we have in the New Testament. He continues his work today, thereby adding more and more to the story as history marches on.

There is no need or opportunity for any of us to write our own Gospel. It would be silly if we did. There is much opportunity, though, for us to reflect upon what Christ has done. Consider the moment you first came to faith in Christ. List five or ten instances of answered prayer. Think about the fact that you know Christ and that he is the source of eternal life. As such, that life will go on forever, which means there will always be more to tell. There are those times, and for me they are many, when the main person we need to tell is ourselves.

If we pause to thank our Lord for giving us eternal life and the circumstances that led to it, we can more firmly establish our relationship with him. If we think back each day and thank him for answered prayer, we develop a posture of gratitude, which is sort of the opposite of greed. And if we consider that there are many more things to come, even more than we can imagine, we develop a hopeful outlook toward the future. All of these things together will help us as we face each new day.

John 20 – Verse by Verse

John Pic

On the first day of the week, some followers of Jesus went to the tomb and found it empty. Later that day he appeared to the to show them he was alive.

John 20.pdf    

John 20.mp3

Here is a link to the livestream video:

https://fb.watch/1NbJWSUvFW/

A Prayer Prompted by John 20

Dear Lord Jesus,

We have not seen you like these early disciples, nor do we expect you to appear personally to us, and yet we have taken that step to believe. With Thomas we proclaim that you are our Lord and our God. 

We thank you for dying for our sins and rising from the grave.  You truly have defeated sin and death.

As the Father sent you and as you sent those earliest disciples, we accept the mission you have given us. We are sent to proclaim the forgiveness of sins to all who believe, who put their faith and trust in Christ and Christ alone. Please empower us to carry out that mission. 

Breathe your Holy Spirit onto us and fill us with his presence and power.

In your name we pray,

Amen

My Lord and my God – John 20:26-28

26 Eight days later, his disciples were inside again, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side. Do not disbelieve, but believe.” 28 Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!”

History has somehow given Thomas the nickname Doubting Thomas. Maybe it is at least a little bit deserved, since he wanted to not only see, but touch, the risen Jesus before he would believe. Then again, all his friends had already had a resurrection appearance of Christ. Nobody likes to be the only one left out.

When Jesus appears among them again eight days later, the Lord singles Thomas out asking him to touch his wounds. Thomas’s response is one of the clearest declarations of the deity of Christ anywhere in the Bible.

“My Lord and my God” is not just an exclamation pointed at a God who is only God knows where. It is an expression of worship directed at Jesus who is standing right before the previously doubting apostle. And, as he is prone to do, Christ accepts the worship of his follower.

In a society and religious culture that essentially defined monotheism for the world, Jesus is willing to be worshiped. Thomas is willing to worship him and proclaim him his Lord and God. We also may be aware that a similar designation, Dominus et Deus, was applied to the Roman emperor Domitian, who likely was on the throne at the time of John’s writing.

This is then a pointed statement. No one deserves the titles “My Lord and my God” other than Jesus. To worship him is not only appropriate, it is required.