Luke 9 – Verse by Verse

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Up until now, Luke has shown us the ministry of Jesus in and around Galilee. This week will arrive at a turning point. Christ will allow his identity to sink in with his disciples and then turn toward Jerusalem.

Luke 09.pdf

Luke 09.mp3

A Prayer Prompted by Luke 9

Dear heavenly Father,

We believe that Jesus is the Christ, your Son in whom you are well pleased, the Holy One of God. We can see that he exercises authority over nature and the spirit world.  We understand that he exercises divine authority because he is God – such as declaring us forgiven of our sins.  He has the right to demand our complete loyalty and trust for the same reason. He is God.  

We accept that following Jesus means we need to be open to being sent out in various ways to serve him.  It means we will have to trust him when that service goes beyond our abilities.

Please help us to see him as fully God as well as one of us, and to see ourselves as no better than others. Please make us willing to give him our complete loyalty and devotion regardless of the sacrifice that requires.

In Christ,
Amen.

A Prayer Prompted by Luke 8

Our Father in heaven,

In sending your Son, you gave us a person who we can watch, listen to, learn from and follow.  Help us to be receptive to all that Christ wants to teach us. In other words, give us “ears to hear.”  Help us to trust that you have everything under control, even when some of the circumstances in our lives seem out of control from our perspective.

We know that Jesus has all power over raging storms, physical illness, armies of demons and even death.  Let us always be ready to seek Christ’s help and to follow him all the days of our lives. This is obviously what you, as our Father, want for us.

In Christ,

Amen.

 

Sometimes it’s not in *how you say it* – Luke 7:31-35

After Jesus reassured the crowd that John the Baptist was pretty much the greatest man that ever lived, the tax collectors and various others present were satisfied.  Not so much the Pharisees and lawyers, who rejected Jesus after rejecting John.  Jesus went on to describe their response, or the lack of one.

31 To what then shall I compare the people of this generation, and what are they like? 32 They are like children sitting in the marketplace and calling to one another,

‘We played the flute for you, and you did not dance;
we sang a dirge, and you did not weep.’

33 For John the Baptist has come eating no bread and drinking no wine, and you say, ‘He has a demon.’34 The Son of Man has come eating and drinking, and you say, ‘Look at him! A glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners!’35 Yet wisdom is justified by all her children.

Pastors and churches like to be relevant, and that is great – to a point.  There is a temptation to let our thinking run wild in that direction.  We may daydream, “Well, if we can only do this, and add this, talk like this, dress like this, and change the decor to this, then …”  

The responses to John the Baptist and Jesus provide some much-needed counterweight to that tendency.  

It would be hard to find two personalities or presentation styles that contrasted more starkly than Jesus and John.  John was famous for wearing rough clothing, preaching in the wilderness and eating mainly bugs.  Jesus was accused of being a glutton and a drunkard.  He never seemed to turn down a free dinner or an invitation to a party.  Rather than hanging out strictly in the wilderness, he wandered all over the countryside and traveled by water.  He was found in the towns and cities of Galilee, in the synagogues or on the seashore, and then in Jerusalem for the holidays.  

The message of both these men, however, was more or less the same.  It may have sounded different, or looked different, if one looked at the messenger.  But they mainly agreed that repentance from sin was needed, and that good works were a corollary to faith.  Jesus drew people to himself, which John did not, but then John also pointed people to Jesus.  

In the end what they said differed little.  The difference was in how they said it.  So what was the difference in response?  Well, there was none.  The same people who followed John also went after Jesus.  Those who rejected John rejected Christ.

Jesus compares his detractors to children in the marketplace that won’t join the game no matter what game is being played. 

“Let’s dance!” one shouts, and begins playing a flute.  No response.  

“How about a nice dirge!”  (OK, it’s a weird idea, but Jesus is just making a point.)  No response in that case either.

For those of us who are attracted to making the message relevant, let this be a caution.  Sometimes, if we are faithful to the message itself, how we say it won’t make any difference.

A Prayer Prompted by Luke 4

Father in Heaven,

Thank you for all that we can learn from Jesus and the way he carried out his ministry.

Thank you that he showed us how to defeat the devil by only being filled with the Spirit and filled with your Word.  Please fill us with your Spirit this day.  Help us further to be students of the Scriptures.  We want to be able to use the Bible rightly whenever we face the many temptations that we do.  

Help us also to have discernment to know the difference between the truth, which comes from you, and the lies that our enemy so craftily tells us.

Teach us to pray about every need, not least the many sicknesses that we face in this life.

And finally, help us to seek you first, so that we might constantly grow in our faith, and help us to set our priorities in accordance with your will.

In Christ,

Amen.

 

Jesus got baptized – John 3:21-22

21 Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heavens were opened, 22 and the Holy Spirit descended on him in bodily form, like a dove; and a voice came from heaven, “You are my beloved Son; with you I am well pleased.”

One of the more remarkable things about this passage is that Jesus got baptized at all.  If anyone had zero need for a baptism of repentance, it was Jesus.  Matthew 3:15 adds the detail that Jesus said it was “to fulfill all righteousness,” but I confess I do not find it easy to say what that even means under the circumstances.

But I do see that many people were being baptized and they certainly saw that they needed a baptism of repentance, even if Jesus didn’t.  At least some of Christ’s earliest disciples were first followers of John, who in turn saw himself as Christ’s forerunner.  Finally, we also know from a later verse, Luke 7:30, that many Pharisees and lawyers did not receive the baptism of John.  

Under the circumstances, we might at least see that Jesus did not want to be confused with self-satisfied Pharisees and lawyers.  If there was to be any confusion, let it be that the sinless Son of God and Messiah went all the way in his identification with sinful humanity.  A baptism of repentance?  He submitted to it, just like so many of his followers.  John, who was some kind of blood relative, saw Jesus outwardly and obviously supporting his ministry.  Christ did everything he could to be “one of us.”

And isn’t that the great thing about him?  God the Son emptied himself and he began his public ministry getting baptized by John.

Luke 2 – Verse by Verse

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Luke tells about the birth of Christ including details that probably came from Mary.  This chapter shows Jesus at the temple shortly after his birth and later, when he was twelve.

Luke 02.pdf

Luke 02.mp3