John 13 – Verse by Verse

John Pic

Omar Yamout walks us through John 13, in which Jesus washes the feet of the disciples. Judas goes off to betray Jesus, while Jesus predicts Peter’s denials

John 13.mp3 (Omar Yamout)

Here is a link to the livestream video:

Whoever believes in him is not condemned – John 3:16-18

16 “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but in order that the world might be saved through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.

It is not uncommon for those who believe in Jesus to still feel a serious level of guilt, shame or condemnation over past or current failures.  We need to remind ourselves that there is no need for this.  This is not to say that sin is OK and not to be dealt with.  We need to repent, come to God again asking for forgiveness and taking our sin to the cross.

Have you fallen in the same way repeatedly?  I want to be careful here as I write this, because I don’t want to be perceived as going easy on sin.  But consider this additional passage, Matthew 18:21-22, where Peter asks about our need to forgive.

21 Then Peter came up and said to him, “Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?” 22 Jesus said to him, “I do not say to you seven times, but seventy-seven times.

God is not asking something from Peter or us, which he is not already doing himself.  I believe this is one way we can look at the “is not condemned” phrase in John.  When Christ died for our sins, he died for all of them – past, present and future.  He gives us power to walk away from sin and the grace to walk in forgiveness at the same time.

In the words of Paul in Romans 8:1-3,

There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus. For the law of the Spirit of life has set you free in Christ Jesus from the law of sin and death. For God has done what the law, weakened by the flesh, could not do. By sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh and for sin, he condemned sin in the flesh.

Our sin is condemned but we are not.

 

Luke 22 – Verse by Verse

Photo for Luke

This chapter, in which Jesus institutes the Lord’s Supper shows us four important things.  They are Judas’s betrayal, Peter’s denial, Christ’s prayer and Christ’s covenant.

Luke 22.pdf

Luke 22.mp3

Here is a link to the livestream video:

Selective sanctification – Luke 11:33-36

33 “No one after lighting a lamp puts it in a cellar or under a basket, but on a stand, so that those who enter may see the light. 34 Your eye is the lamp of your body. When your eye is healthy, your whole body is full of light, but when it is bad, your body is full of darkness. 35 Therefore be careful lest the light in you be darkness. 36 If then your whole body is full of light, having no part dark, it will be wholly bright, as when a lamp with its rays gives you light.”

There are really two lessons here:

1. Don’t hide the light you have.
2. Make your whole self full of light.

Most often, when I’ve heard this passage taught, the focus is on the first lesson.  I also cannot read it without hearing a cheerful melody resonating in my head.  

This little light of mine, I’m gonna let it shine
Let it shine, let it shine, let it shine!

So let’s focus on the second one:  Make your whole self full of light.

In other words, we need to beware of what we might call Selective Sanctification.

Let’s read Luke 11:35-36 again.

35 Therefore be careful lest the light in you be darkness. 36 If then your whole body is full of light, having no part dark, it will be wholly bright, as when a lamp with its rays gives you light.

Sometimes we can want to be holy, but only in the ways that we like best.  Then at the same time, we leave a little room for a few other things – maybe things that are not really holy at all.  We can have our favorite (little?) sins.  We can have the ones we don’t yet realize we have and maybe don’t really want to even know about.

Leviticus 11:44-45 says,

44 For I am the Lord your God. Consecrate yourselves therefore, and be holy, for I am holy … 45 For I am the Lord who brought you up out of the land of Egypt to be your God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy.”

A few chapters later, in Leviticus 20:26, we read,

You shall be holy to me, for I the Lord am holy and have separated you from the peoples, that you should be mine.

Then in the New Testament, Peter reminds us, in 1 Peter 1:14-16,

14 As obedient children, do not be conformed to the passions of your former ignorance, 15 but as he who called you is holy, you also be holy in all your conduct, 16 since it is written, “You shall be holy, for I am holy.”

We need to be holy all the way through.  And if you think you are there yet, think again. Beware of selective sanctification; just be holy.