My Lord and my God – John 20:26-28

26 Eight days later, his disciples were inside again, and Thomas was with them. Although the doors were locked, Jesus came and stood among them and said, “Peace be with you.” 27 Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and see my hands; and put out your hand, and place it in my side. Do not disbelieve, but believe.” 28 Thomas answered him, “My Lord and my God!”

History has somehow given Thomas the nickname Doubting Thomas. Maybe it is at least a little bit deserved, since he wanted to not only see, but touch, the risen Jesus before he would believe. Then again, all his friends had already had a resurrection appearance of Christ. Nobody likes to be the only one left out.

When Jesus appears among them again eight days later, the Lord singles Thomas out asking him to touch his wounds. Thomas’s response is one of the clearest declarations of the deity of Christ anywhere in the Bible.

“My Lord and my God” is not just an exclamation pointed at a God who is only God knows where. It is an expression of worship directed at Jesus who is standing right before the previously doubting apostle. And, as he is prone to do, Christ accepts the worship of his follower.

In a society and religious culture that essentially defined monotheism for the world, Jesus is willing to be worshiped. Thomas is willing to worship him and proclaim him his Lord and God. We also may be aware that a similar designation, Dominus et Deus, was applied to the Roman emperor Domitian, who likely was on the throne at the time of John’s writing.

This is then a pointed statement. No one deserves the titles “My Lord and my God” other than Jesus. To worship him is not only appropriate, it is required.

Palmer St. Podcast: Loving Obedience

 

 

Love without fear would subvert his authority.  Fear without love would make us gloomy and discouraged.  Love and fear together make the walking, serving and keeping of God’s commandments a joy.

Deut 10.12-22.mp3

Deut 10.12-22.pdf

024 Deut 10.12-22.pptx

Palmer St. Podcast: Hear, O Israel!

Judaism has no over-arching statement of faith, catechism or official creed.  This passage from Deuteronomy, however, may be the closest thing it has of that variety.  We might think of this as the core of a biblical system of belief.

Deuteronomy 6.4-9.mp3

Deuteronomy 6.4-9.pdf

Deuteronomy 6.4-9.pptx